Selling Worship

For some reason, printer/copier companies have been knocking on our door lately. I went to a little mixer a couple of weeks ago to check out a company with my brother. I wasn’t severely impressed with them, but it was a good experience and it got a few ideas of the direction I want to head with that sort of technology in mind. Today a small group of us went to another mixer “working lunch” with a guest speaker who acted like he knew quite a bit about church communications, and after 4-5 minutes, I realized he was a product pusher, and not a communicator. I was slightly perturbed by it and found myself immediately dismissing what he was saying.

Shortly after that, it was time for the worship meeting, something I genuinely look forward to, this is where all the “magic” happens, in my opinion. This is the only space we can all get together and hash out ideas that will either become part of a worship experience or not. As we started the meeting, I was determined to make them view creativity in worship differently no matter what. It wasn’t until the middle of my rant about why we should be using social media in worship that I recognized the similarities between the speaker at the lunch I attended and myself. Now, it wasn’t about sharing the ideas, it was about selling them to the worship team.

There I realized I had made a fatal mistake. These meetings aren’t about selling my ideas to them, it’s about finding the most suitable way to express ourselves in worship at our services.

In the end, worship isn’t about doing the flashiest or techiest things possible. It’s about breaking hearts and renewing the spirit within. Our main goal shouldn’t be to maintain job security or do something simply because another church is doing it, you need to do what’s right for your congregation and what’s right for the Kingdom. If you do that, everything else will fall into place as it should be. And that’s where innovation in the Church begins.

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